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A refugee's story from the heart

I said to myself "What about a story from one of the refugees attending our church. I will give the person some questions to answer, and will work on her responses to make it acceptable". How smug, how condescending...

I said to myself "What about a story from one of the refugees attending our church. I will give the person some questions to answer, and will work on her responses to make it acceptable". How smug, how condescending...

I did write the questions, I did get the answers, but I read more into the answers more than just giving me facts. I hope you will feel the emotional side of the response. It is printed as I received it.

I was born in a village is called Tel Hormuz which related to Al-Hasaka city, north-east Syria. Tel Hormuz was a village with almost 600 people. Most people in my village worked in agriculture. In fact, they mostly grew wheat, cotton and different kind of fruits and vegetables e.g: grapes, apples, tomatoes. On the other hand, some people who had, degrees or certificates, had jobs in the city in different kind of companies. My dad worked, beside to agriculture, in Syrian Oil Company in a town is called Al-Shadadi. My family’s financial situation was in the middle between rich and poverty, but we were in a good situation to live in Syria because everything was cheap. I grew up in a Christian family. In addition, we used to go to the Church of the Ancient East which is only in Assyrian language.

For my education, the last school that I went to was called Al-amal School for Girls. I got General Baccalaureate Diploma-Scientific section with GPA 90.14. Personally, my favourite subjects are mathematics, chemistry and physics. Then, I went to Al-Furat University to take general mathematics for only one semester. After that, ISIS came and attacked our village in 23rd March 2015. They came in a vast number, so they could abduct some people from my village and they killed others, one of them was my cousin, Elias, 23 years old. Besides, they kidnapped some girls from other Assyrian villages that were close to ours and forced them to get married one of their members.

Now, I’d like to talk about the period when I lived in Lebanon. Emotionally, I was incredibly sad, because I was forced to move out of my country. Even though it was a tough time, it had some advantages. Because I worked there as a Retail Sales Associate, I’ve got more self-confidence. I worked in one of the suburb of Beirut which is called Al-Hadat. Otherwise, I got some experience that hopefully would be useful in Canada. By contrast, I was treated badly because I am Syrian person. On other words, Lebanese people are racist in one way.

The young lady asked me to give her a mark for her paper...I told her I was not a teacher but 75% seemed reasonable. I told her why...for only her ears/eyes.