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Letter to the Editor: Don't Bank On It

Ray Turchansky's article, "To Err Is Institutional" strikes a chord with me. When I went to Canada Trust to pay for a subscription to the Edmonton Journal with the invoice at hand, it was quite a surprise in a few days to get a call from A.M.A. asking what I wanted done with the money.

Dear Editor-

Ray Turchansky's article, "To Err Is Institutional" strikes a chord with me. When I went to Canada Trust to pay for a subscription to the Edmonton Journal with the invoice at hand, it was quite a surprise in a few days to get a call from A.M.A. asking what I wanted done with the money. I said "what money?" They said they had $195.20 and asked if I wanted to add another co-member. I said "no, that money was to go to the Journal," so they sent it back. The bank didn't seem to know where it was to go, so just put it back into my account. When the Journal said my subscription was going to run out, I had to make a second trip to the bank to get things corrected.

About the same time, when I paid my credit card bill at Bank of Montreal, again with the invoice in hand, the teller entered the sum of $ 474.27 into the computer when it was supposed to be $447.22. This mistake took three trips over a three month period to fix, each time trying to explain what happened to a different branch manager. At one time, to try to correct their mistake, they gave me an advance deposit and later they charged me interest for the advance!

The next run around was with Scotia Bank, who were handling my Registered Retirement Income Fund. They sent my T4 info to a subsidiary, who in turn passed it on to Montreal Trust. When Scotia Bank realized they had made a mistake, they sent a revised T4 but it seems Scotia Investments and Montreal Trust would not acknowledge the revised info, so when Canada Revenue Agency got the wrong info they cut my Guaranteed Income Security payments to myself and my wife, which cost us over $1,000 in lost income. It really makes you wonder how we are supposed to trust these huge financial institutions when such simple mistakes can occur.

Sincerely,

Kenneth G. Thomas, Edmonton