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Where to look when looking for a home

Looking to move? But where? I was recently in that position: looking. Everything in a lower price range was too basic, with absolutely nothing except a stove, fridge, and some closets.
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Looking to move? But where? I was recently in that position: looking. Everything in a lower price range was too basic, with absolutely nothing except a stove, fridge, and some closets. Higher prices included everything one could possibly think of: entertainments, foot care, exercise room, a resident bus. They do everything for you except tuck you into bed (and likely that for an extra fee). But there was nothing in-between. However, I found an excellent resource to share with you, if you're getting tired of pounding the pavement, looking. It's the SAGE Directory of Senior Services, 2013/2014. Pages 142 to 228 are packed with info on every kind of accommodation, from independent living right down to dementia care. You'll find what the rent is; what is, or not, included therein; room dimensions, and whether they take pets. Maybe you'd like to find a place in Stony Plain, Sherwood Park, or other outlying areas. They're included, too. For when you're touring these places, SAGE has even included a check list, so you can ask the right questions to find the right answers, without forgetting any. Phone SAGE (Seniors Association of Greater Edmonton) at 780-5510. Or try your local library; they often have them.

As you wander around Edmonton's many farmers' markets I bet you, too, have wondered just what an “approved” farmers' market is. I've found the answers, but too lengthy to quote here. Just put “The Globe and Mail, Edmonton's battle of the farmers' markets” in your web browser. But I've been around long enough to remember what it was like before they were “approved”. You could buy cracked eggs! I fed my family on them. They were sold cheaper because they weren't “perfect”. We'd take the “imperfect” empty cartons back to the farmer. (Early “recycling,” kids!) You could buy big 50 and 100 pound bags of potatoes, washed or unwashed, for a better price. It all helped.

My children all reached adulthood with few problems. On their early visits to the paediatrician, not once did the doctor ask if I'd been feeding them imperfect eggs or potatoes.

Things you see sometimes stay in memory. For instance, at the old farmers' market on 97 Street, among the crowds I saw a very elderly lady, down on her hands and knees, under the tables, scooping up the fallen vegetables. Was she stealing? Possibly. But she more likely knew it would be swept up and thrown out, which was unthinkable waste to her and most of our generation.

But, “that was then; this is now.” New problems need new solutions for diseases we never heard of. So the government must get in there, and they did. No bargains; no cracked eggs; no unwashed potatoes. Now, everything must be so perfect that supermarkets can no longer mark down “imperfect” anything, as they once did.

But there's always competition. Some “unapproved” markets are setting up alongside the government approved. You'll want to read more on this one. Check it out.





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