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Opinion

Making sense of the new golden age of television

Making sense of the new golden age of television

Television has long been ubiquitous in our lives. Since it rose to prominence in the 1950s, it has became a universal experience for people of all ages.
It's summer, and the 'silly season' begins on TV

It's summer, and the 'silly season' begins on TV

June marks the end of the regular TV season and the beginning of what’s called the “Silly Season.” Most of the darker, more challenging dramas are gone. Replacing them are schedules full of reality shows and game shows.

Digging up the dirt on dirt (sorry, that should be 'soil')

So here we are in June. Here in the province of Alberta, that means we have entered into the one-quarter of the year when we are almost guaranteed not to have frost or snow.

Digging up the dirt on dirt (sorry, that should be ‘soil’)

So here we are in June. Here in the province of Alberta, that means we have entered into the one-quarter of the year when we are almost guaranteed not to have frost or snow.

How Facebook went from fun to fearsome

As Prime Times' resident "young person", I'm an old hand at Facebook. But I'm seriously thinking of ditching the social media site, and you should, too. Let me explain. I’m in my thirties and I first signed up for Facebook while in college.
Curtain comes down on plenty of TV favourites

Curtain comes down on plenty of TV favourites

Even in this era of binge-watching and shorter seasons, May is still the month when many of your favourite network shows air their season finales.

We are truly living in Fantasyland

I recently finished reading one of those door-stop sized books about American history called Fantasyland, by Kurt Anderson. The subtitle of the book explains it all: "How America went haywire".

Pipeline debate overtaken by irrational thinking

Why do we have a country? Because people generally recognize that working together achieves many good things while constantly fighting makes daily life worse. This principle seems to be eluding B.C.
Curtain comes down on plenty of TV favourites

Curtain comes down on plenty of TV favourites

Even in this era of binge-watching and shorter seasons, May is still the month when many of your favourite network shows air their season finales.

We are truly living in Fantasyland

I recently finished reading one of those door-stop sized books about American history called Fantasyland , by Kurt Anderson. The subtitle of the book explains it all: "How America went haywire".
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